Monday, August 23, 2010

High Traffic but No Sales?

One of the top complaints I hear from online sellers is that they have plenty of traffic, hearts and activity on their website; however, very little of this activity actually converts to sales. While there are manyreasons that factor into an actual conversion, I am going to cover 3 simple things that you can do to at least improve your odds. Did you know that you have only 10 seconds to capture the attention of a prospective customer? When someone lands on your page the average shopper will make their decision to stay or leave within that time frame. Harsh isn’t it?
1. Logo/Banner
So imagine you are perusing through Etsy and you see a lovely shop name and avatar that captures your attention. You hop on over to their page and are confronted with a blurry, pixelated half-hearted attempt at a banner. Why? Oh Why? The horror!  Now, this is probably one of the most common first mistakes of a new seller. You see all the spots that need to be filled in on your shop; panic and open up Microsoft draw and start copying and pasting away until you have a rectangle that can be plopped into the banner location. Time passes as you get busy filling up your new shop and that banner just gets left in the dust. This insanity has to stop. I am not asking you to become an overnight graphic design success story. I am asking you to hire help. There is a plenty of talent available on Etsy for you to hire and design a custom banner that fits your shop’s brand and vision. Some graphic designers offer pre-made versions for as little as $5.  A true professional graphic designer can run anywhere from $50-70 to design your banner, avatar and vacation banner. Price too high? Check out alchemy on Etsy and let the bidding wars begin.
Your banner is the first shot you have at making a good impression. Would you wear flip-flops and ragged bermuda shorts to a job interview?  Not likely. Take your business and image seriously and potential buyers just might do the same.
sterling silver cuff bracelet juella designs
2. Product Shots
Yes. I’m going there. You know who you are. Many sellers make excuse after excuse of why they don’t have the time or resources to improve the quality of their product shots. Such a shame. You can be the sweetest seller on Etsy and may have incredible products to offer; however, if your photos are dark and clearly shot on your couch or carpet..goodbye potential buyer. Why would I want to buy a crochet cap for my newborn niece that has been sitting on your living room floor, where who knows what has stepped on that carpet? You are an online store, your product shots are your only way of showing off  your wares. If I can’t see them or maybe that yellow 1970′s couch just isn’t my thing, why would I choose your store over the hundreds of others out there? Product shots are a learning curve that can absolutely be mastered with a little time and training.  Sure the thought of starting over can be a bit daunting but once you start researching Etsy Success stories: your simple point, shoot, and load concept will disappear.
Change your attitude and sink into the process of taking product shots. Look through your favorite magazines. If your products were to be sold in their pages, what would that set-up look like? Soft, natural lighting? Beautiful fillers? Do you need to steal your brother or sister for an afternoon to model your latest line? Learn the settings on the camera you already have, your only investment will be your time (and maybe a latte’ for your model). Find an open Saturday morning and go to town with your shots. Looking for more help? Check out our Photography Spark series and let’s crop those excuses down to size.
3. Shop Selection
Fun scenario, let’s say you need to find a birthday card for Aunt Sue and land on a promising little card shop. You start scanning through their listings and see a birthday card, a bracelet, organic soap, mosaic tiles..wait, what was I looking for again? My mistake, I thought this was a card shop as advertised..off I go to the next seller on the list. Nothing irritates a potential customer more than to be mislead. If your shop is a mix of all things crafty then please do not advertise yourself as “cards by so and so.” Do you need to define your focus? Do you love both jewelry and soap? There is nothing wrong with opening up a second shop. Your perceived hassle of  juggling two stores is minimal compared to the potential of  two solid product brands. Why should your incredible sea glass jewelry have to take a back seat to your best-selling organic hand cream? Showcase your products, do not confuse buyers. There is nothing wrong with a little cross-promotion between shops but if I’m on the hunt for a bath bomb..those earrings better get out of my way.
*Images shown in this post are shops that are doing things well. Professional logos, product shots to inspire you and a shop selection that flows. These shops keep you in their virtual door. Now get after it!
~Amber Jordan

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3 comments:

Carol/Firecrackerkid said...

Hi Sue:) I'm guilty of that one. LOL. I need to put more umph into my staging shots. Great post!

Snugglebug Blessings said...

Sue, thank you again for sharing your wealth of information re: Etsy I come here often to learn as much as I can about selling. I have contemplated opening a second shop and this just confirms it. Again, thank you God bless. Cathy

Dark Squirrel Victoria said...

Thank You Susan, you inspired me to do some major work on my Etsy shop yesterday. It looks better and maybe it will be easier to search now.

Victoria :)

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